Design

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The Design Community joins march for women's rights after Trump inauguration

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The monumental marches that took place around the world over the weekend as Donald Trump was being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, were perhaps more notable than the ceremony itself. Millions of women and men marched to show solidarity on women's rights, as well as other causes including immigration reform and racism that will be put at risk by the Trump administration.

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A scene from the Washington march last Friday

These marches, which gained a significant amount of support from the press and assorted celebrities, took place in cities all over the US, from Washington DC and New York to Miami and Chicago. But they were also staged in major cities in dozens of other countries, including Japan, the UK, Sweden, South Korea and Canada. Joining the celebrity and media endorsement, designers and architects from the community joined the fight, with Yves Behar, Gareth Pugh and Assemble among the millions who took part in the worldwide marches.

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Designers and architects march for women

The Fuseproject founder Behar attended the march in New York with his mother and children, Misha Kahn and Joe Doucet attended the main march in Washington and Dutch designer Niek Pulles, who recently moved to the states to work for Nike, joined a march in Portland. Closer to home in London, meanwhile, fashion designer Gareth Pugh marched with a banner reading “The Pussy Grabs Back,” Camille Walala joined the throng in the centre of the capital and women from the Assemble collective were seen sporting a rather clever banner (who doesn't love a good pun?).

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David Adjaye

Also speaking out against the Trump administration over the weekend was architect David Adjaye, who claimed, in an interview with Dezeen, to be “embarrassed as a male,” that women still need to fight for gender equality in this day and age.

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Shepard Fairey's adapted Hope poster

In a further act of defiance from the design community, meanwhile, Shepard Fairey adapted Obama's iconic Hope poster to portray an anti-fear message for Trump's inauguration. Fairey, applied the same style and colour palette to a new image series focusing on the USA's minority populations. These were distributed as placards on the day of Trump's inauguration, and printed as full-page ads in the Washington Post.

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Actress Scarlett Johansson shows her support

More than 250 major American architects also signed an open letter to the new President last week urging him to take action on climate change. It's a plea that will probably fall on deaf ears, but the sentiment is there, and in these dark days, sentiment is more important than ever.

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