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AKQA urges companies to adopt nature Code of Conscience

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AKQA has invited the top 10 construction equipment companies of the world to adopt its new open source software to protect nature reserves from destruction.

Despite their protective status, one third of the areas are under threat from human activity. In collaboration with NGOs from all over the world, AKQA is launching an open source software called Code of Conscience that restricts the use of heavy-duty vehicles in protected land areas.

Code of Conscience uses open-source mapping data from the United Nations World Database on Protected Areas – updated monthly by NGOs, communities and governments – in conjunction with existing GPS tracking technology that’s installed in construction vehicles, to autonomously restrict deforestation crews from entering protected zones. A small, low-cost chip has been developed to equip the code into older, non-GPS models, and the software is available for free to everyone here.

An invitation comprising the Code of Conscience chip embedded in a wooden sculpture of an endangered animal has been sent to the CEOs of the world’s top 10 construction equipment manufacturers, with a vision for all new machines to leave the factory with Code of Conscience pre-installed.

Chief Raoni Metuktire – the most prominent Native Brazilian leader and a living symbol of the mission to preserve the rainforest and its indigenous culture – affirmed the urgent need for action: “May all heavy machine manufacturers and leaders come and see this. So that the tractors operate, but stop when they reach our land, our forest and so it continues to exist. It is for our awareness and for the forest to stand up.”

“The illegal destruction of nature affects everyone, whether through the reduction of biodiversity, violence against communities, degradation of soil, or the heating of our planet” added AKQA ECD Hugo Veiga.

“Code of Conscience now invites heavy-duty vehicle manufacturers to become part of the solution to these critical global problems. And it’s clearly economically viable; while it may deter some operators who wish to break environmental laws, it will attract the growing number of responsible organisations who recognise the strategic value in supporting the rainforest amidst an increasingly environmentally conscious world.”

Code of Conscience has been developed in partnership with the Raoni Institute, which represents the Kayapó indigenous group and its mission to stop unfettered Amazonian destruction, as well as the Amazon Environmental Research Institute, and the Peabiru Institute, which promotes social diversity throughout the region. The ambition is for Code of Conscience to become federal law.

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