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Identity Crisis: Rebrands of the Week

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The Liberal Democrats

After a disastrous election (by anyone's estimation) that saw the departure of their figurehead Nick Clegg after he managed to hold on to a paltry 8 seats (down from 57 in 2010), it's not surprising that the Liberal Democrat party is plotting a rebrand alongside other significant changes. Speculation for a rebrand first emerged when Lib Dem MP Tim Farron, who is a favourite to lead the party in the future, referred to them simply as “The Liberals.” Now that might very well sound like the name of a crappy punk band from the late 80's, but it certainly has a ring to it right? Of course, any decision to drop the word “Democrats” from the party’s name would draw a line under the party’s links with the Social Democratic Party, which the Liberal Party merged with in 1988 to form the Lib Dems. It would also help the party capitalise on its long history and Liberal politicians such as Gladstone, Lloyd George and William Beveridge.

The Liberal Democrat party is plotting a rebrand alongside other significant changes

The rebrand would also mean a new logo of course, with the “Bird of Freedom” logo that was created by Rodney Fitch when the party first formed, seemingly surplus to requirements for a party looking to distance itself from the recent past. The logo received several slight updates over the years, including a reworking by Rodney Fitch & Partners in 1999, and in 2013 the logo was reworked again, with a new typeface and 3D shadowing effect added. Any new identity would also presumably strive to come across as less “Designed,” as the Bird of Freedom logo might look rather pretty, but its elegance and air of fragility obviously haven't done the party any favours.

 

Cadbury Mini Rolls

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Cadbury Mini Rolls is refreshing its branding and packaging to bring it into line with the “Joy” positioning recently introduced by Cadbury. The redesign, which follows Pearlfisher’s 2013 rebrand of Cadbury Dairy Milk, has been created by Robot Food, who were tasked by brand owner Premier Foods with modernising the brand. The redesign sees the new strapline “With BIG personality” added, while each flavour has been given its own individual slogan.

Cadbury Mini Rolls is refreshing its branding and packaging with a redesign by Robot Food

Robot Food said: “By breaking away from the industry standard, the Mini Roll instantly becomes proud, confident and more appetising, and by taking full advantage of the speech mark shape created by the swirled crème filling, the new identity is as bold and fun as the product offering itself.” Jo Agnew, Head of Cadbury Cakes, added: “The new pack design is the step change that we were hoping for and really does drive modernity and stand out for the Cadbury Mini Roll brand. We have a fully loaded re-launch happening with TV advertising and strong in-store activation, and this is all complemented by the impactful pack re-design that we will see on shelf.”

 

Thomson

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TUI Group, the parent company of Thomson's Holidays, is set to unify its companies under an umbrella brand, meaning Thomson will effectively be losing its brand name. The umbrella brand will allegedly look to group all TUI-owned holiday providers (Thomson, First Choice Holidays, Arke and Marmara) under one name, with the group's five airline carries (Thomson Airways, TUIfly, TUIfly Nordic, Jetairfly and Arkefly) also to be brought under one umbrella that will be based in Britain.

Thomson Holidays looks set to lose its brand name thanks to parent company TUI Group

The rebrand follows a merger between UK-based TUI Travel and German TUI AG in January this year, which formed the TUI Group. Several Thomson brands also currently use the same logo, which was introduced in 2001 as a way of creating a recognisable, synonymous look among the group’s companies. The logo, which features the letters T, U and I and appears to look like a smiling face, was created by Interbrand Cologne, and was originally utilised by TUI AG’s predecessor brand Preussag, before being applied to Thomson Holidays in 2002, alongside other TUI company Lunn Poly, which was later rebranded under the same umbrella as Thomson.

 

KitKat

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The first release in a new campaign from Nestle for their KitKat chocolate bar will align the iconic snack with video streaming kingpins YouTube by having the word “KitKat,” replaced by the words “YouTube break” on more than 600,000 wrappers. This is just the first of many packaging redesigns the company will be rolling out on over 100 million special edition packs ,in what brand owner Nestlé says is the biggest packaging redesign for KitKat since it first came to market 80 years ago.

KitKat are placing the words “YouTube break” on more than 600,000 wrappers

The campaign has been developed by JWT, and will see 400 individual packaging designs and 72 different types of “Breaks” introduced as part of KitKat's “Celebrate the breakers break” campaign, amongst which will also include “Movie Break”, “Lunch Break” and “Sporty Break.” In a unique effort to combine social media and chocolate, the campaign’s dedicated hashtag #mybreak is also being directly moulded into the chocolate of 22 million bars! The collaboration between Google (Youtube's parent company) and KitKat comes after Google named its 4.4 Android operating system update after the classic chocolate bar.

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