Inspiration

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Exploring the power of sudden inspiration with Adriano Chiarelli

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To an Italian and a film lover, the name of Paolo Sorrentino may evoke pleasant memories and feelings of pure admiration. You can imagine how much of an honour it was for our Italian editor to have a chat with videographer Adriano Chiarelli, who had the chance to work with the Academy Award-winning director for ten years.

Adriano has just recently relocated to London, in the few months before lockdown, outbreaks and pandemic became part of everyone's daily vocabulary. And while challenges and adversities may discourage most, we believe nothing will scare off Adriano: the freelance videographer loves not writing for days before letting inspiration take over, and he always makes the deadline no matter what. It must be an Italian thing.

For this Member Spotlight, we tried (and failed) to understand the secrets behind the success of a talented filmmaker, who's just ambitious enough to not let anything stand in his way.

How did you get into the industry?

I initially started worked in Italy as volunteer assistant director for Academy Award winner Paolo Sorrentino. Working with him I've learned a lot of secrets about camera movement, lenses, lights and acting. Our professional relationship lasted ten years, and I'm grateful to have worked with such a talented director.

Where are you based now and who do you work for?

I've relocated in London in January, just few weeks before the pandemic started. I'm actually self employed and I'm approaching the English audiovisual market. Once a month I go to Italy where I work as screenwriter and essayist.

FLYING IN THE SKY_SPOT 60'' from Soul Crime on Vimeo.

If you weren’t in your current industry, what would you be doing?

A criminal lawyer.

Can you explain your creative process?

Both as videographer/filmmaker and as screenplayer/writer I spend a long time thinking about what I will do and how I can do it at its best. For example, when I write a book or a film, I don't write a line for days. Until the crucial moment: magically, I write all at once.
The most important thing for me is to meet deadlines. No matter what, I will meet my deadline.

How has technology affected the way you work (if at all)?

It's mandatory to be costantly updated about what new technologies offer: cameras, software, equipment. You have to be always up to date or you will be cut out.

What’s your secret to staying inspired and motivated?

Honestly, there isn't a secret. If you're not more or less inspired or motivated you can't do this job. Ideas should always fly in your brain. The majority of them are bad ideas, but one in a hundred will be a good idea to develop.

What’s the work achievement you’re most proud of?

The "Best documentary" prize I won at the Rome International Film Festival as a producer for the documentary "Happy Goodyear", a film that discloses the behind-the-scenes activities of 'Goodyear,' the multinational tyre manufacturer. It's been a hard inquiry about pain and abuses committed by managers against workers.

How do you recharge away from the office?

Walking with my son or my partner. Thinking, relaxing, boxing, reading, drawing

What advice would you give to other aspiring creatives looking for work?

It's a difficult road, but nothing compares to the satisfaction of creating your own ideas and being appreciated for that. So it's important to not giving up.

What’s your one big hope for the future of the creative industries?

We must survive this scary pandemic. After this difficult moment our industry will be stronger and more creative than ever. There will be fresh ideas, fresh energy, new horizons.

If you could change one thing about the industry, what would it be?

Nothing. Without its good things and its bad things, it would not have the same poetry.

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