Inspiration

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CP Loves... Jeremy Deller's 'Sacrilege'

Published

by Ashley Morrison.



Tempting as it was today to blog about the Olympic Opening ceremony (you've gotta love that James Bond bit with Her Maj, haven't you?) I've decided to talk about another round-the-country event which is taking place at the moment as part of the London2012 Festival. And anyway, how often do I get to blog about a massive bouncy castle?

But it's a bouncy castle with a difference. For a start, it's by far the biggest I've ever seen; it's absolutely massive. And secondly - and more interestingly - it's a perfect life-sized replica of Stonehenge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sacrilege is the creation of Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller. 'A lot of my work deals with history, and Sacrilege is no exception,' he says. 'This is a way to get reacquainted with ancient Britain with your shoes off.'

Commissioned by the Glasgow International Festival of Art and The Mayor of London, among others, Boris Johnson, said: 'You don't have to be a specialist in ancient British history or an acolyte of the summer solstice ritual to be aware of the unending fascination that Stonehenge continues to inspire around the world. Jeremy Deller's Sacrilege is a wonderfully witty, quite literal leap into that history and a fantastic example of the irreverence that are hallmarks of our great British humour and our incomparable artists. I have no doubt it will be a great hit with Londoners as well as visitors to the capital.'

Truth be told, I'm not entirely sure how much children will be educated by the experience - although I suppose that depends on how much their parents explain about the real Stonehenge, its historical significance and its value as a feat of engineering. I think they're more likely to think 'this is the biggest and best bouncy castle EVER!' But that in itself is no bad thing and it's all good clean [free] fun, besides being a very original idea. And as modern art goes (and having recently snorted my way around the Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy) it's good to see something well executed as well as functional and fun.