Advice

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How to... Find a job in design

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Finding a job in design is not particularly easy as it's one of the most competitive industries out there. Most design companies (when they advertise jobs) seem to always ask for at least 3 years experience, so the chicken and egg scenario starts. How can I gain the experience when nobody seems to take a punt?

This is a question we get through from users all the time. So here are a couple of suggestions.

General suggestions on finding a design job:

  • Put together your portfolio. Whether you do this on CP or use other sites or go old school and have a printed one - a portfolio is essential to showcase your creative work to potential employers.
     
  • Keep trying - it's tough trying to break into anything to do with design! The problem you face has faced us all when we first started.
     
  • Work on your portfolio - and I mean really work on your portfolio. As you'll have no experience the only way that you are likely to impress an employer is by having a fantastic portfolio. And believe me it needs to be amazing, as you will be up against a lot of others. If you you know the type of work the organisation you are going to does, then try and make your portfolio match what they are looking for - there's no point in going to a packaging design job with corporate ID work.
     
  • Do things that suit the job you are looking for. If you are a web designer , oddly enough it may help to get some urls up. If you are a fashion designer - make some clothes. You get the drift. Again this may sound lame - but you have no idea how many people we get ringing up saying things like I'd like to be a designer and have not worked towards getting there!
     
  • Courses - have a look for some. Courses can be a pain and expensive but you will pick up bits and pieces of useful information from them. Having at least 1 qualification is almost mandatory on a CV these days! Not only this but often you'll meet like minded individuals and can swap ideas - your tutor may even have connections.
     
  • Register with us - sometimes we get training jobs and junior roles online. In fact we advertise them for free. If you fill out our quick CV we'll use this to match up as well as we can jobs that we think are useful and email them to you. Aren't we nice?
     
  • Try and get some local work. Think of small companies that might need a site, build one for a friend, or a tutor - it doesn't matter who, just get some experience.
     
  • Talk to colleges. Most colleges I have seen have pretty big career sections on their site, they should be experts in placing students in their first job.
     
  • Harrassment. Hassle friends, family, design companies, recruiters anyone you think may have access to a job. Offer design companies to work for free. Each step is a step closer.

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